Employees

Nancy McIntyre, District Manager

My name is Nancy McIntyre and I was hired as the District Manager for the Longmont and Boulder Valley Conservation Districts in January 2002. 

I was raised on a farm in Central Nebraska at the foot of the Sandhills where my Dad grew popcorn as his main crop.  Irrigation is a major source of water there even though they receive more rain than we do here. 

I am heavily involved in the education programs of the Conservation Districts and enjoy teaching the children about conservation of water, soil and air. 

 

Cyn Coyle is the new District Conservation Technician

Hello, my name is Cyn Coyle. I am excited to join the team in the Longmont NRCS Field Office. 

My position is under general supervision of the District Conservationist and the Conservation District Supervisors.  I look forward to learning about conservation practices, gaining more experience with field surveying and field work in general, and becoming proficient with AutoCAD and ArcGIS.

I am originally from Vermont, but lived in the Netherlands for over 25 years before landing in Colorado.  After living below sea-level for so long, it was breathtaking to move to the Front Range of Colorado.  The beauty of the Rocky Mountains and my passion for rock/mineral-hounding ultimately led me to pursue a B.Sc. in Geology from CSU. 

I am thrilled that the Conservation Technician position involves a lot of field work as I love spending time outside.  Besides maintaining our large yard, I also help maintain a ranch property at Fort Morgan.  Work seems endless, but I love spending time out there with family, extended family, and friends.

I look forward to meeting and working with many of you.

Richard England, Summer Field Coordinator for the Mediterranean Sage project. Jayden Imes is the summer technician. 

Richard will be working with the Conservation Districts from May 5 through July 21.  His responsibilities will be to work with landowners in the Mediterranean Sage area of Boulder County to continue to eradicate the noxious weed.  There are about 1300 acres of land between US Highway 36 and US Highway 119 that have some infestation of the Med Sage. 

Mediterranean Sage (Salvia Aethiopis) is a List A noxious weed that is from the mint family and is an escaped ornamental.  Med Sage is a short-lived perennial that in its first year is a rosette of 7-10 leaves and the second year shoots a "candelabra" 2-3 feet tall with showy white flowers.  The plant flowers in May and June with seed set in July and August.  The seeds (up to 100,000) are dropped as the flower head breaks off and becomes a tumbleweed.  The noxious weed invades pasture, rangeland, meadows, riparian areas, rights-of-way and other open areas.  The tumbleweed is often caught in yucca plants or fence rows so you may find a large infestation of plants in those areas.

If you see any of the plants on your property, please give Stacy a call at
(720) 378-5521 so that she can check out the plants and help with eradicating them from your property.

 

 

Nancy McIntyre has been with the Districts since 2002.

Cyn Coyle has been hired as the District Conservation Technician for 2017.

The Districts also hire a summer field coordinator for their Mediterranean Sage project.

 

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